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Issue 19.6 ('Memorable Passwords')
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FEATURE

Creating Memorable Passwords with Xojo

Sometimes you need a password you can actually remember

Issue: 19.6 (November/December 2021)
Author: Marc Zeedar
Author Bio: Marc taught himself programming in high school when he bought his first computer but had no money for software. He's had fun learning ever since.
Article Description: No description available.
Article Length (in bytes): 15,664
Starting Page Number: 22
Article Number: 19603
Resource File(s):

Download Icon project19603.zip Updated: 2021-10-31 22:33:38

Related Link(s): None

Excerpt of article text...

Like it or not, passwords are everywhere in our digital lives, and with them protecting our very identities and possessions, the days of using our pet's names or "1234" being "good enough" are long gone. Today we must have unique random passwords for every account and that means a password manager to remember complex strings like 9X2*3FggYHyRYt.

However, there are a few passwords you need to memorize—like the password that unlocks your password manager!

Then there are passwords you need to share with a few trusted others (definitely not your Netflix account). But random passwords, while secure, can be hard to type or remember.

Also, if you're like me, you're the technical support for non-technical relatives or elderly friends. Those people don't always use best practices, understand how to use a password manager, or want the expense or added hassle. They need to use more secure passwords, but you don't want them so complex they'll be forgotten or written down (a security flaw).

For these situations, it'd be nice to have a way to create secure, yet memorable passwords. Since those two are polar opposites, how do we do it?

The Key to Secure Passwords

...End of Excerpt. Please purchase the magazine to read the full article.